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Guatemala - Wiwitz
Guatemala - Wiwitz
Guatemala - Wiwitz

Guatemala - Wiwitz

Regular price £11.00 £0.00 Unit price per
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This clean, sweet washed coffee gives us notes of apricot jam and figs and its complexity to have you reaching for a second, or a fourth cup.

Wiwitz is a first generation farm. The farm has a name in the Popti language, the word means ‘Arriba Del Cerro’ or in English ‘Up the Hill’. This name is very suitable for this finca, since the plot is in a high up, remote location.

The Wiwitz hill is a paradise, for its rich soils are full of organic matter and are home to many microorganisms, which make sure that the coffee farms are always vigorous and flourishing. Besides the healthy soil they are also the best environment to work, since the workers are surrounded by various species of singing birds and wild animals.

After the ripe cherries of Antonio’s farm are picked they are pulped on the same day. This is done in the field, since his farm is in a remote location. The slimy coffee beans are then transported to be milled further, while the leftover cherry skins are used as useful organic fertilizer to nourish the soil for further coffee production.

Once the green, slimy beans have made their way to the mill, they are dry-fermented for 32 hours. Once the fermentation is complete the coffee is washed to further clean the wet parchment coffee. The only step left for Antonio is to dry the coffee, and this is done in concrete patios for the duration of 6 days. The first 2 days, the coffee is laid out to dry for 8 hours. The remaining days the coffee is given 6 hours of sun every day. To ensure even drying, Antonio and his family make sure the beans are moved every hour.

Antonio tells us: “We started the farm with my parents about 30 years ago, then due to economic problems the growth of the farm stagnated due to economic problems. 6 years ago my father began to have health problems, so I stayed in charge of the land; currently the family depends on this crop, so we try to obtain the best possible results.”